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wejones

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Reply with quote  #16 
   After using this Verizon hot spot thing for a couple days, it works great for the wireless devices getting to the internet, however I've had no luck getting the wireless devices to communicate with either other wireless devices or with the wired LAN.  That has essentially cut me off with respect to using my main computer with the computer cards that displays on my TV. 
   I haven't tried all the options that came to mind yet, but the few things I've tried have messed up the wired lan so much that the devices on it no longer talk to each other.  Weather station no longer works, printers stopped working, etc.  I'm about at the point where I'm likely to just give up on communicating with the wired LAN until I get regular internet back.  Ie, get up out of my recliner and go down to the basement where the video computers are located.
   One thing that is a likely problem is that my LAN is on a 10.1.x.x subnet with most devices using static IP#s, but to get the wireless devices to talk to the new hot spot, they had to be switched to dynamic IP#s so they're now on 192.168.x.x .  I tried switching parts of the lan to 192.168.x.x but forgot that my main router would have an IP# that conflicted with the new hot spot.  I was hoping that I could get one of my routers to connect to the hotspot wirelessly, then get communication to the rest of the lan, however while that might have given computers on the lan access to the internet, it seems like there is no communication between different wireless devices connected to the hot spot, so the wireless devices still couldn't connect to the wired devices.
    Anyway, I'm about out of ideas here, so I'm curious whether other people using similar hot spot access points are able to communicate with other devices on a home LAN???


updatelee

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Reply with quote  #17 
So you want your router to be able to grab the internet from your cell? there are different ways of getting that done but the easiest imo would be to get a wireless to ethernet bridge, setup the bridge then plug it into the WAN port on your router. You can also use an old router to setup the same thing. Your existing router alone wont do though, you'll need to add something else to it.

UDL

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big_hemi

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Reply with quote  #18 
I had a VZW hotspot about 5 years ago.  I wanted a backup in case my cable internet went down.

I couldn't find a way for it to act like a router.  Being that this was just an "access point" my devices could connect to the internet, but none of them could talk to one another as they would on a LAN.

My weather stations, surveillance system, and switched outlets just wouldn't work right because they require resources from other devices that typically are on the network.  I used the 192.168.x.x scheme and even changed from static to dynamic but that just messed things up even worse.

I never tried updatelee's suggestion but it sounds like it could work.

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wejones

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Reply with quote  #19 
Well, after almost giving up, I finally decided to run an ethernet line to my laptop.  I used to do this with one of my computers with 2 nics, both of which were on the same subnet, but that led to bizarre results at times, so I quit doing that.  But in this case, with the wireless on one subnet and the wired on another subnet, it seems to work.  So I got the printers working and my weather station is back online with my wired computer, and I can use VNC to control my sat cards again [smile]  . 
   However, I haven't gotten my weather station to send data out on the internet yet, and I can't connect to my wife's laptop and she can't access anything because she doesn't have an ethernet cable where she sits.
   Anyway, I'm making progress, and I still have a couple ideas.

RimaNTSS

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Reply with quote  #20 
Some cheap routers (like this one on the screenshot) has bridging possibility. It is easy to set-up to connect it wireless to another router or cellphone. ScreenHunter_273 Apr. 11 21.23.jpg 
For some routers is possible to install alternative software like DDWRT and enable them to work in bridge mode as well.

DarkSky

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Reply with quote  #21 
Many years ago I bought what UDL is talking about at Best Buy. Just wanted to see if my cell phone would work using it with a couple of computers at home. It worked just fine.

At that time people were using them to hook to their game boxes because they did not want to deal with a cat5 cable. Just plug it in the Internet / wan side of your existing router. The lan side of the router is on it's own separate network so all of the computers hooked on that side should see each other as usual.

The only issue I see would if devices on the lan side are using wifi you would need to configure separate channels on the far end of the freq. spectrum as opposed to what the wireless bridge is using. Some times if there are strong signals being used they can over power each other if they are too close to each other. I have had to do that when in an apartment when a neighbor had their own wifi going. Hopefully that make it work with 2 wifi's going locally. I never tried that.

Make sure the hotspot lan side is not on the same network as the router's lan side network.
wejones

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Reply with quote  #22 
Re UDL's suggestion, I didn't completely understand how that would work in my situation, and couldn't find anything advertised with that specific name locally.  Still not sure how a wireless-ethernet bridge differs from a wireless access point. 
    I did try to figure out a way to connect an old router instead of the bridge, but I couldn't figure out how to do it.  It didn't seem possible to use the router features of the router since the internet port isn't wireless, so I disabled that, so the router was then basically a wireless access point.  However, on trying 2 or 3 different routers, none of them seem to see the hot spot device for some reason. 
   My main problem now, is that the wireless devices on the hotspot can't reach each other.  They can reach the wired LAN computers through wired ethernet, but not via wireless.  Most of my LAN computers don't need to reach the internet, but I thought that I had found another method to give a couple of them internet access.  Ie since I had the wireless hotspot connection and wired connection to the LAN on my laptop, I enabled the
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\Tcpip\Parameters\IPEnableRouter
key, thinking that it might allow LAN devices to reach the internet through my laptop, however that didn't work.  I was thinking that I needed to use the route command to create a route through the laptop, but I couldn't figure that out. I created a route on the LAN devices giving it the hard wired port of the laptop as a gateway, but while the packets reached the laptop, they apparently didn't make it through to the hot spot.
   Anyway, I've run out of ideas for now, and by the time I figure it out, I'll have a regular internet access and not need it. 

   BTW, off topic a bit, my old satellite internet that failed, was a strange setup that I don't understand.  Ie it was all done over a single cable, like either full duplex or some kind of token passing system.  With my old sat internet, there were separate receive/transmit cables, and I could connect the receive to a FTA receiver and see the channels on crazyscan or other spectrum displays.
Anyway I'm curious re how that works?
 
dem0nlord

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Reply with quote  #23 
A wireless bridge is also often sold as a wireless game adapter. It acts as a wireless CLIENT, effectively turning a wired ethernet port into wireless, connecting it to a wireless access point. That's the difference between the two -- one accepts clients, one is a client.

Your devices don't communicate with each other over your hotspot's wireless network because it does not do switching of the local wireless network, it only routes local wireless traffic to the cellular network.

This is why you want your devices to all continue to connect to your local wi-fi as normal, those devices won't know anything is any different than it ever was at any other time and will still communicate with each other. Then use the wireless bridge to make the wireless connection from your local network to the hotspot. This is simple assuming your router has an ethernet WAN port connected to whatever currently brings internet in. If it's some kind of all in one thing which they provide and directly connects to satellite, telco, or cable then it won't have a WAN port and that complicates things a bit, you'd want to get your own router.
wejones

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Reply with quote  #24 
Thanks. That explains the bridge function well.
I'm still confused though re UDL's saying that one could use an additional router in place of the bridge. Only thing I can think of now that I haven't tried is to somehow hook it up backwards, connecting two WAN ports together??
Also confusing, but possibly a hint at my problems...... after installing this hotspot thing, while trying to get routers to connect to the hotspot, I noticed that my wireless computers that weren't connected to the hotspot apparently weren't seeing each other or the test router's I was experimenting with. It seemed like the hotspot was shutting down wireless communication on the subnet it was on. Communication on my normally used router on the other subnet was still functional. It's possible that one of my test routers wasn't working, but I'm pretty sure that at least one of them was working well when I took it out of service.
Captain_Kurtz

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Reply with quote  #25 
Some routers can be configured to operate as either a router, a wireless bridge, or as an access point.

All closely related and similar, but distinct functions.

The wireless bridge function is essentially the inverse of the access point function.

merkin

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Reply with quote  #26 
yup..toss ddwrt on it and call it a day.
wejones

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Reply with quote  #27 
  OK, I THINK that I see how I could do this with what I already have connected, but it would require quite a few changes to my current setup, so I think I'm going to wait until I get regular internet back, and then experiment. 
  But what I found is that my current main router (which I have had turned off since I lost sat internet) has a repeater function and a base station function. 
  Actually I have 2 routers in my system, one which has routing turned off and is just being used as an access point switch. The other one is my main router that has the base station function.  I'm thinking that if I switch to base station mode that I can use it to connect to the hotspot device, and it will serve as a bridge to my LAN.  To enable this mode, I have to select a channel to use and enter the MAC# of the hotspot. 
  What I'm not sure of is that the directions say that the hotspot would have to be set in repeater mode for the connection to be made, and not sure if this is possible.  The directions also have a button to enable wireless client association, which it says is used to enter bridge mode, so I'm thinking this might be what I need to use.
  I'm also not sure if I should have hotspot and lan on the same subnet, and I'm confused re why this router still doesn't see the wireless hotspot.  Perhaps it's only visible if a connection is attempted, and entering the MAC# starts the connection attempt?  But anyway, even if this will work, I think it would require significant changes to my current setup, which I don't want to do with less than a week before I get a real internet set up. 
   But anyway, thanks for all the suggestions.  I hope to experiment more with this after my internet connection is back to normal, because we can't afford to lose internet right now if I mess it up.
Thanks

 
Captain_Kurtz

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Reply with quote  #28 
wejones, without disturbing your current configuration, why not try taking your spare router, connecting it to your laptop with an ethernet cable, and see if you can configure the router as a wireless bridge - i.e, get it to wirelessly connect to the Verizon hotspot, and also share that connection with the laptop?

Once you have succeeded in doing that, it's a straightforward step to unplug the "wireless bridge" router from the laptop and connect the ethernet cable to your LAN router's WAN port instead, and don't forget to configure the LAN router to use the wireless bridge or the hotspot (I forget which is the correct choice - whatever works) as its "gateway" to the internet.

Also, having the hotspot and LAN on the same subnet is not a good idea.

wejones

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Reply with quote  #29 
Thanks.  I'll definitely try that, but I'm going to wait 2 or 3 days, because we can't afford to lose internet right now.  I'm not positive that the router function is actually working on the router that I would have to use as a router, as it's turned off now. I can't remember why I hooked it up as I did, but there is a good chance that the router function stopped working on the faster of the two routers, so I used that router as a wap switch, and a slower router as the actual router.  The router I've been using as a router is also the one that can be reconfigured as a bridge.  Once I get dsl internet connected, both of those routers will be out of the system, so I can experiment without bothering anything.
  It still bothers me that none of my routers seem to see the hot spot via wireless. Hopefully that will change when configured as a bridge.  Also, all of this has reminded me that I've always avoided bridging, because once my wife accidentally configured a new computer's NIC as a bridge, and it really messed things up for a while.
Captain_Kurtz

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Reply with quote  #30 
Quote:
It still bothers me that none of my routers seem to see the hot spot via wireless.


The router should have a "site survey" function to scan for other access points in the area, to help you choose a wireless channel. Have you tried that? It should see the hot spot that way, if your computer can see it.
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