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snowman

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Reply with quote  #1 
Im sorry for posting this twice I was in the wrong category for the other post. Just wondering if cpr and minnisota public radio moved on 99w. Centering the signal on satsignature show both signals gone and I havent been able to get them after a year of having them solid. Thanks for any news.
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iboston

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hey SnowMan, i cannot get it either.  Not on either of my receivers.  I usually can lock both the NWPR on 3770h and the one at 3744h but, i cannot get them today.  When did you notice it left?  I haven't hit this channel in a couple weeks.
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iboston

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Reply with quote  #3 
I cannot find anything on the internet about frequency changes...
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snowman

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thank you for checking! Yes its been a couple weeks for me too ☹️. Not seeing them on satsignature either. There is a thread in the iptv section here from feb about them going to dvbs2 on their national feed and that was completed. Not sure if the disappearance is related. Thanks again.
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iboston

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Reply with quote  #5 
I would deff. like to know where they relocated too.  If they went to DVBs2, where is that at???  I was so proud to lock that 741 symbol rate.
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snowman

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Reply with quote  #6 
I flipped back to the IPTV section to check on their normal national signal. I guess they always had a DVBS IPtv feed. That feed recently switched to DVBS2 and just after that these two 99w feeds disappeared. I wonder if the two 99w feeds existed while the migration of the IP signal was going through? Just speculation. Below will paste the current IP signal info from the other thread. Yeah way back when those narrow signals showed up I was pleasantly surprised to see them both pop right in haha. I was not even going to try thinking... theres no way this receiver will lock a 741 symbol rate.. but it did. Score haha.

Originally Posted by photoman76
NPR looks to be changing their radio distribution from DVB to DVB-S2.
There is a new mux on Galaxy 16.
3727 H 6800
DVB-S2 8psk
3/4 FEC
Pilot Off

The DVB mux is still at 3758 H 11250.

Both are using IP format.
I still can't get any audio though.
I don't think MIPS ever figured out this format.
When I run it through IPCleaner, it doesn't say format not supported, but it also doesn't show any cleaned files.

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agus0103

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Reply with quote  #7 
Did anyone ever find Minnesota Public Radio again? This afternoon on MPR News, they gave the usual twice-a-year reminder about the sun potentially affecting the satellite signal to stations outside of the Twin Cities. So, they are still on satellite, most likely Galaxy 16. Given the time the announcement was made, the only other possibilities besides Galaxy 16 would be SES-1 and SES-3.
photoman76

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Reply with quote  #8 
I've never found it.
NPR has two IP muxes on Galaxy 16.
Maybe they moved there.
agus0103

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Reply with quote  #9 
The closest MPR Classical station to me had garbled audio on Wednesday as the sun moved past Galaxy 16, so they are definitely still there.

I suspect they are indeed using an NPR mux. After some research, I found that NPR has had a service for two years now that lets regional and statewide public radio networks eliminate the need to have their own satellite or microwave uplink by letting NPR do the satellite uplinking. I'm somewhat surprised MPR hadn't gone that route earlier, as MPR (through American Public Media) is the second largest distributor of programming to public radio stations in the country and provides a backup to NPR's primary satellite uplink site, so a dedicated connection between NPR and MPR would have already been in place.
Captain_Kurtz

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Reply with quote  #10 
OK, now I'm confused. Since NPR has two IP muxes on G16, and one of the advantages of IP delivery is the ability to pre-feed content to stations,
and if MPR is now using that service, then why didn't MPR pre-feed their affiliate network with whatever programming was scheduled to occur during the solar outages???? 
[confused][confused][confused][confused]
It's not like the times of the solar outages are unknown.
Maybe because they are new to IP delivery of their programming and don't quite get the concept yet?

Second question, can the NPR IP muxes be received and played back (maybe not in real time) on a computer, after processing the files?
agus0103

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Kurtz
OK, now I'm confused. Since NPR has two IP muxes on G16, and one of the advantages of IP delivery is the ability to pre-feed content to stations,
and if MPR is now using that service, then why didn't MPR pre-feed their affiliate network with whatever programming was scheduled to occur during the solar outages????
[confused][confused][confused][confused]
It's not like the times of the solar outages are unknown.
Maybe because they are new to IP delivery of their programming and don't quite get the concept yet?


The music services could probably be pre-fed with progrmaming, but the news service during the time of the outage is a mixture of live and recorded content with a short lead time and I don't think pre-feeding would all that feasible. On the other hand, MPR is quite familiar with the concept. Even before this probable move to the NPR IP mux, they long had the ability to air customized top-of-hour IDs, underwriting messages, and weather forecasts on the vast network of stations.

I suspect another factor is that most MPR stations have an online backup that quickly comes on in the event of the satellite signal weakening below a certain threshold. In previous years, that has minimized the impact from solar outages to only a few seconds rather than the few minutes that would otherwise be possible. This fall, I didn't hear any of these backups come on, though there's a possibility that they were able to sync the satellite stream to the online stream to the point where the backup kicking in is no longer apparent.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Kurtz
Second question, can the NPR IP muxes be received and played back (maybe not in real time) on a computer, after processing the files?


The documentation on the PRSS website suggests the muxes may use some sort of encryption or proprietary format. PRSS/NPR makes stations purchase specific receivers which then have to be authorized to begin receiving programming.

On another note, there's a recent news article on the PRSS website which explains which programming is where on Galaxy 16 and what's going on as far as the move from DVB-S to DVB-S2 is concerned:

Stations currently receive live streams from Galaxy 16, transponder 3, and files from Galaxy 16, transponder 5. Our initiative is to introduce a new modulation scheme that would allow us to optimize bandwidth as well as combine streams and files in a single carrier on Transponder 1. The PRSS has successfully tested and validated the combined streams and files carrier on an adjacent transponder and has been working closely with participating beta stations to gather data and validate service.

Beginning in November, and extending through the fall, the PRSS, in coordination with stations, will begin the first technical phase of issuing network changes on your IDC 4104 receiver to retrieve files traffic from the new combined carrier.  The migration to the new carrier will take place on November 5, 2017,  from the PRSS NOC in Washington, and we will send communications out to you in advance. 

Once all interconnected stations are migrated from the existing files carrier to the new combined carrier, we will share the details, timing and any relevant information for moving live streams to the combined carrier. PRSS plans to begin helping stations make this transition starting in January 2018, with an eye toward having all stations switched to the combined carrier by April 2018.

TheSatBible

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Reply with quote  #12 
There has been a lot of reorganization of those radio carriers (or some might be data).  It seems like transponder 3 has been cleared from a lot of those with many seeming to move to transponder 1.

MPR is on transponder 1 on a frequency I can't remember because I can't find my piece of paper where I wrote it down when I did signal investigations.  I do recall from memory it's still using 740 SR.   I have other targets on transponder 1 that I am going to have to find time to work if I can find that piece of paper, doing individual signal locks every 5 units of SR starting at 100 until I hopefully get lock.  One target is a radio network that used to be on transponder 3 but seems to have converted to XDS based on info from their website.  I'm not stupid to email the contact for more info since I don't have a business relationship with that network so I bet by doing the trail and error SR method I may be able to lock their new XDS carrier if it moved to transponder 1 during the conversion.

photoman76

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Reply with quote  #13 
On Transponder 1 I see the following:

3723 H 9090
DVB-S2 QPSK
5/6 FEC
Pilot ON
This is the new NPR mux.

There are many very narrow signals from 3701 H to 3716 H, but I can't lock any of them.


On Transponder 3 I see the following:

3758 H 11250
This is the original NPR mux.

3772 H 2552
DVB-S2 QPSK
3/5 FEC
Pilot ON
NPR test channel and a few other audio services.

3776 H 2400
DVB-S2 QPSK
3/4 FEC
Pilot Off
bvovn
photoman76

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Reply with quote  #14 
After trying SR 740 I was able to find MPR.

3706 H 740
snowman

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Reply with quote  #15 
Comes on good thanks for finding this!
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Fellow Members, your posts are welcome here! Do not worry about posting everything perfect. Different receivers and LNB's will give you different Frequencies and Symbol Rates. Some set top boxes, PCI cards and USB receivers, Do Not Require all of the same information that others may need. It is not Required to post everything that others may need to tune in a feed. It is just most important to share the find. We can always adjust the Frequency and Symbol Rates and try the various Modulations and FEC's on our own receivers until we get a lock and then give a polite reply with what works for your receiver, as that information might help others as well. We all appreciate the efforts and energy of the Posters!

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